Songwriterter sees good news in declining role of church music.

JEFF BRUMLEY | MAY 24, 2017 Baptists News Global

Some people were surprised — and worried — to learn from that sermons are a much stronger draw to church attendance than music. And it was worse than that for music lovers. The Gallup presented a list of motivations Americans give for going to worship, and music was solidly in last place. But with a month to reflect on the discovery, Christian musician, songwriter and minister Kyle Matthews is not worried. Far from it. “I think it might be good news,” Matthews said during a recent conference call. “It indicates people are more hungry for substance than we give them for,” said Matthews, minister of worship arts at First Baptist Church in Greenville, S.C. Matthews has had his eye on Christian music, and what churches want and don’t want, for a long time. he was a artist and a songwriter for publishing companies in Nashville, Tenn. He’s won a Dove Award and other Christian songwriting achievements. 38 37 an April poll survey FaithSoaring Churches Learning Community credit For more than 20 years recording FEATURED We are reader supported DONATE N S EARCH ews Opinion Curated More i 5/24/2017 Songwriter sees ‘good news’ in declining role of church music – Baptist News Global https://baptistnews.com/article/songwriter­sees­good­news­declining­role­church­music/#.WSXcH2grI2x 2/7 Kyle Matthews But Matthews said he left the industry for its focus on profit at the expense of providing theological education and Christian formation. Through his current church ministry, he pursues worship songwriting that places liturgy above entertainment. But music that provides inspiring, substantive lyrics does not sell in a praise­and­worship world, Matthews said. That’s why the Gallup poll’s findings are so interesting, he told other ministers on the conference call. The Christian music industry, he said, is made up of people who are trying to serve a market. “They are business people, not theologians, historians or music educators. They are business people.” And what sells is music with shallow lyrics with little or no theological content. Matthews said he’s known songwriters and performers who are unfamiliar with Scripture. As a result, music has become “wallpaper instead of furniture” in worship. Rather than working to instruct Christians in the faith, contemporary worship music is filled with mantras and clichés designed to alter moods, Matthews said. That kind of music comes and goes because it’s become disposable. “I don’t think people are allowed to get to know church music well enough to interact with it.” But the industry isn’t the problem, Matthews added. “If the church would demand a different product, they would get a different product.” It’s also the people in the pews. The industry is “responding to what the public is asking for.” That has been praise music which is entertaining and happy, and avoids darkness and difficult concepts, he said. “It can become a form of escapism rather than a form of encounter with God.” It’s why the April Gallup poll could be good news. It may signal that people in the pews may want something more. That could be why sermons are at the top of the list, and contemporary Christian music, with its mantras and clichés, is at the bottom.

AT FIRST LIGHT…GOD’S DIVINE PROVIDENCE – Thomas Crowl

JOB:37:16…dost thou know the workings of the clouds…the wondrous works of His which is perfect in knowledge?

In a number  of recent articles I have written of special signs God has sent to remind me of His presence, often when I was at a low point in life and without much hope. On a cloudy Monday morning recently I awoke in another hospital bed trying to get my heartbeat regular and allow me to go home. On a particular Monday of late I opened my eyes to a solid wall of gray cloud and just then my blessed family physician appeared. A constant smile on his face and the look of possibility in the air. As he spoke his opening lines I saw the solid bank of clouds break and a piercing light emerge to chase the gloom from the air. This would be the beginning of hope and divine intervention!. His mastery of my problems would quickly disappear as he called a close colleague to resolve a urinary emergency. It went on like this for some time til I realized the completeness of  God’s mercy. In hours I would have all my issues dealt with, an expert at arms length and what would have been a very long day shorten considerably. Being named Thomas doubt kind of went with the name!

     You are always the possibility of success and when God is in your corner that possibility expands considerably. This was the special lesson of the day God intended. As the day wound on I learned of the incredible work of my doctor. His calls to associates, his re-working appointments and bringing in the cooperation of many others. In a world of “what’s in it for me” I was confronted by God’s special instruction…that the best of what we are is available as a gift to be given at the first call for help. The glow of that day will last with me for many years to come…that love and kindness are His greatest gift and not to be doled out piecemeal…and that we can join this cadre of souls anytime.

     I thought on other issues then, the special gift in life of a loving wife, who though troubled by her own ailments, would rise each day to gather and solve my problems. The welcoming door of my home, though not perfect, was as warm and welcoming as any.

     It is my sacred prayer for you this day that God will open those clouds in your life and help you welcome in the brilliant life of promise…available in that next minute. 

JOB WOULD GIVE US SO MANY EXAMPLES OF THE POSITIVE FORCE THAT LIVES WITHIN THAT NEXT REQUEST…A FORCE THAT DRIVES AWAY

Mayor Summey Issues 12th, Say Something Nice Day Proclamation

Last night, May 11, 2017, at a meeting of the City of North Charleston City Council Mayor Keith issued a proclamation for Say Something Nice Day on June 1. Councilman Brown presented it to me. It was the 12th. time Mayor Summey has done this. This is where it all began. Neither Mayor or I knew at the time how far our efforts might go. The one thing we do know is that it is more needed now than ever.

I am grateful to Mayor Summey for his leadership in this area and more important I am grateful for the example he sets in the realm of civil discourse. The rest of the country has had an opportunity to look at him up close and they have seen a man who practices what he preaches. I hope everyone will celebrate Say Something Nice Day on June first. It doesn’t hurt one bit and it offers a world of improved relationships.

Resurrection, for us and the planet: Just add water – Rev. Susan Sparks

This sermon in recognition of Earth Day was preached on Easter Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York City. April 21, 2017 Baptist News Global

It was in the wee hours of Easter morning 1971 that I crawled out of bed in my Road Runner pajamas and tip-toed into the living room to see what treasures the Easter bunny might have left. I could see the basket from the hallway; there was the usual chocolate rabbit, some plastic eggs, a few marshmallow peeps and … could it be? Yes, nestled among the rabbit and the eggs was a box complete with a tiny aquarium, food, magic powder, and ready to hatch Sea-Monkeys.

Anyone who lived through the 1970s knows this ridiculous toy. It was almost as dumb as the Pet Rock, but not quite, since it actually did something. Sea-Monkeys were marketed as pets, but were in reality freeze-dried brine shrimp that would miraculously come to life if you would, as the package said, “Just add water.”

Ecstatic, I ran into the kitchen, took my little packet of magic powder, poured it into some water, and in a few minutes, the water began to transform. The little dried specs got bigger and bigger, and then finally started swimming around. It was literally resurrection. Just add water!

Goofy as the 1970s Sea-Monkeys were, I decided that image was appropriate for Easter, especially Easter 2017, because our resurrection — creation’s resurrection — turns on whether we just add water.

This idea first came to me in March when I attended a multi-day conference at Trinity Episcopal Church on Wall Street where they talked about the existential crisis we faced on this planet over water. But it fully solidified while I was preparing for Good Friday and I was reading the passion story from the Gospel of John.

As you probably remember in the story, Jesus utters two phrases before he dies on the cross. The last one we all know: “It is finished.” But the one before that is one we don’t always focus on and it’s only told in the Gospel of John. The moment before Jesus gives up his spirit, he says these three words: “I am thirsty” (John 19:28).

The obvious assumption is that this was a request to quench a burning physical thirst as Jesus had been on the cross for hours. However, I believe there was a deeper meaning. For in that moment, Jesus thirsted not only for literal water, but for living water — for God. Jesus’ story is our story, too.

Like Christ, we are thirsty. Some of us are thirsty for literal water, but all of us are thirsty for living water. And our survival — our resurrection — depends on quenching that thirst.

Sadly, some of that thirst is literal. Most of us have no idea what it truly means to say, “I am thirsty,” in a literal sense, but over 700 million brothers and sisters on this planet sure do. On this planet, over 700 million people lack access to safe water and more than two billion do not have adequate sanitation, including 210 million citizens in the United States.

And it’s not only the lack of clean water, it’s the lack of water in general. In two generations, scientists are predicting that most of the then nine billion people on Earth will live with severe pressure on fresh water.

And for anyone listening who thinks global warming is “fake news,” let me share this. Within the last year, NASA satellites have been able to use gravitational measurements to calculate that more than half of Earth’s 37 largest aquifers, our underground water supply, is being depleted.

Those aquifers, which take thousands of years to fill, supply 35 percent of the water used by humans worldwide. The satellites showed that 21 of the world’s largest aquifers from India and China to France and the United States have passed their sustainability tipping points, meaning more water is being taken out than replaced — tapped for everything from mining to gas exploration to — irrigation. As one of the senior NASA scientists put it, “We’re running out of water.”

Yet, even with these terrifying scientific findings, none of us seems to really care, especially here in our privileged Western world. Oh, sure, we’ll read about it, maybe even watch a water documentary on Nat Geo, all the while sipping our Evian water, our dishwashers humming happily in the background.

America is one of the worst abusers of water, from our giant waterparks and carwashes, to the precious water being guzzled by our perfectly manicured lawns, to our desert oases where we drain the life blood from our water tables so that things like the Fountains of Bellagio can continue.

We would be wise to remember the words of Archbishop Thabo Makgoba of Cape Town: “We don’t inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children.”

If we would stop for one moment and listen, we would hear our brothers and sisters crying, “I am thirsty.”

If we would stop for one moment and listen, we would hear our Earth crying, “I am thirsty.”

And then, and only then, might we realize that our resurrection — our survival — depends on quenching that thirst.

But as I said earlier, there are two kinds of thirst. Some of us thirst for literal water, but all of us thirst — emotionally, psychologically, spiritually — for living water. And that thirst comes in many forms.

Some of us thirst for meaning and direction because our dreams have dried up.

Some of us thirst for mercy, a place of forgiveness, a second chance.

Some of us thirst for love.

Some of us are thirsty for health, for an end to chronic pain or disease.

Some of us are thirsty for justice, for an end to hatred and bigotry, for righteousness to roll down like a mighty stream.

Many thirst for confidence in our government leaders.

Most of us are thirsty for peace, for a world where we once again feel safe, a world where we don’t wonder, every time we get on the subway, if our neighbor with the large backpack is carrying a bomb.

We are all thirsty. All of creation. Some thirst for literal water, and all of us for living water. And the message this Easter 2017 is that resurrection is possible. We just add water.

But what does that mean in real terms?

There is a sign over the doorway of the chapel run by Mother Teresa, and that sign has four words: “I thirst, I quench.” It was her belief that when we offer a cup of water to those in need, we are also offering water to Jesus on that cross. We are quenching his thirst.

Remember Jesus’ own words in Matthew: “I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink. What you did for least of these, you did for me” (Matthew 25:35, 40).

In quenching Jesus’ thirst, we quench our own. It is in serving him that we are healed. It is in following him to the tomb that we are brought to life by the angels.

Jesus says in John, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. … Out of the believer’s heart shall flow rivers of living water” (John 7:37-38). When we quench Jesus’ thirst, we heal ourselves because we are connecting with the living water of God.

We are facing existential threats to our planet. We are witnesses to life and death issues with our global brothers and sisters. And we face a crisis of meaning and hope in our own lives.

And that is exactly where Jesus was on Good Friday: an existential crisis, a life and death moment, a crisis of meaning and hope. But that was not the end of his story, nor is it the end of ours. For on Easter, his thirst was quenched, and the living waters rushed back in. And so it can be for us as well.

We have the power to resurrect this planet.

We have the power to heal the suffering and resurrect the lives of many of our global brothers and sisters.

We have the power to resurrect our own hearts.

And here’s how we’re going to do it.

Starting tomorrow morning, when you wake up, I want you to do two things:

First, drink a glass of water. Why? Because we must start our day by quenching our thirst for literal water and for living water.

We all know that literal water hydrates our bodies, bringing us strength and stamina and health.

But that glass of water is also a connection to living water. As in Genesis, the spirit of God still hovers over the waters. Water is the source of life; it was God’s first creation; 65 percent of the human body is water, 72 percent of the Earth’s surface is water, and in its image is the face of the Holy. Drinking a glass of water is the ultimate prayer, for by doing so, we are taking in literal and living water.

Then, the second item for the day: find a way to quench someone else’s thirst.

If you see someone thirsty for literal water, give them a drink. Donate or work with an organization that fights to provide access to clean water. Strive to cut down your own use of water to help quench the thirst of the Earth.

Or if you find someone is thirsty for living water, then quench their thirst as Christ would — quench it with love, with mercy, with compassion, with justice and hospitality, patience, fairness, forgiveness, and humility.

As the old saying goes, “We are healed to help others. We are blessed to be a blessing. And we are saved in order to serve.”

A few weeks ago, a bit of rain fell in Death Valley — one of the hottest, driest places on Earth, water being a rarity. But sure enough, a bit of rain came and fell on the dry, lifeless valley of death. And suddenly that desert exploded in wildflowers with brilliant colors and blossoms of all imaginable types. It was life exploding out of death.

As followers of a risen Christ, we too have that gift of a second chance, we too have the power to heal, to mend, to pour life back into a lifeless planet, to pour love back into a loveless world, and to quench our deep thirst for living water. Through Christ, we have the power of resurrection. All we have to do … is just add water.

BE STILL AND KNOW – The Daily cUP

Posted by Jo Turner on  “Silence is the language of God, all else is poor translation.”

                                         Rumi, Persian mystic and poet

As the Wednesday Daily Cup blogger, I usually start thinking about what I might write on Sundays. This often begins with phrases or words that are stuck in my brain: Scripture passages, adhesive phrases that I’ve heard and read, or just the lyrics of my life–thoughts to turn into words that will eventually pour out on a page.

Rev’d. Geoffrey, no stranger to the right use of words or a handsome turn-of-phrase, is incorporating a new practice in our Sunday morning worship. Silence. He has requested that we observe some significant silence after the sermon. Even though we have been doing this for a few weeks, I initially forgot last Sunday and was getting agitated at this quiet passing of several minutes with no words.

Maybe it’s different in other parts of the country, but here, time is money and influence; time is control. We’re told that words matter. How many of us get antsy when a conversation lags and we feel compelled to fill the vacuum with small talk?

Some years ago, I flunked my initial foray into sitting with others in silent contemplative prayer. True silence is the emptying of our internal chatter, verbalized or not, to create space, and that was a challenge. Even in bed on restless nights after 20 wordless minutes, my husband would suddenly say, “You’re thinking too loud!” Indeed I was.

It’s probably about getting older, but now I prefer the silence. We learn that what we are thinking, what we have to say, really is not so vital. Our words pale in comparison to just listening and resting in God’s presence. Sometimes the presence is more than enough; often, we gain awareness of God’s wisdom for us.

Annie Rosenbauer, contributor to Krista Tippett’s On Being: “Our silence creates space to listen. Our listening creates space to take notice. Our noticing creates space for amazement. It is our amazement that gives us the energy to create change, whether that be in ourselves, in other people, or in the world.” That sounds like a God plan to me.

Integrating silence into our worship, I am reminded of the power of communal silence. Together, as we quietly center in God’s word for us from the sermon, as we collectively quiet ourselves, we strengthen our relationships with God and with each other. That’s another wonderful layer of worship.

Lent is an ideal time to get re-acquainted with silence, creating listening space in church and in all the other aspects of our lives. This noisy season in our national life intensifies the need for stillness, and for being with the One who gives us life and hope.

Shhh. Do it right now.

“O God of peace, who hast taught us that in returning and rest we shall be saved, in quietness and in confidence shall be our strength: By the might of thy Spirit lift us, we pray thee, to thy presence, where we may be still and know that thou art God; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”                      Book of Common Prayer

COMMENTS


    Palmettobug Digital - Charleston computer consulting